Do I Need To Replace My Whole Roof?

When it comes to the roof over your head, there’s a fine line between tearing down the entire thing and simply making a few repairs or adding a fresh layer to what’s already there. Although some homeowners will be faced with the former, and therefore should expect to shell out a bit more cash, sometimes you can get away with saving some money (the latter). After all, making a well-informed decision is key and we’re going to walk you through a few of the things you should consider in the process:

You Should Replace Your Roof If:

  • It’s Approaching 20-25 Years: this is the typical lifespan of a roof and as yours nears the end of this span, it may be worth replacing the entire thing rather than continuing to make, or pay for, small repairs.
  • You Notice Rot or Sagging: these can be a bit more tricky to detect, as it may not be as obvious as damaged shingles or blatant holes. However, you should always be keeping an eye out for any areas of the roof that seem to be rotting or sagging.
  • Shingles Are Curling: this is never a good sign as it can leave your roof more susceptible to leaks and damage from heavy winds.

You Should Reroof If:

  • It’s Approaching 20-25 Years, BUT: the roof is still in good condition and you don’t find yourself needing frequent repairs.
  • You Have Minor Issues: small leaks or damage do occur from time to time and it doesn’t necessarily mean you need a whole new roof. If there is no major water damage, missing shingles or mold, it may make more sense to reroof.
  • Some Shingles Are Cracked, Ripped or Torn: in this case, it usually makes more sense to lay some new shingles over the old ones, rather than replacing the whole roof. If the shingles are showing very minor damage, they may even be able to repaired on-site.

Still not sure whether you should reroof or replace the entire thing? Give the experts at Preferred Exterior a call today! We’ll help you make the best decision for your unique situation.

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